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CNA Insurance

 

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Group Long Term Care Answer Center
group long-term care answer center

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About CNA 


Click here to view long-term care savings. 

Illustrative Examples
 

The need for long-term care knows no age and no gender. By planning now, you're preparing for what many families face — the unexpected.

 

Sources for statistics are located at the bottom of the page.

Younger Workers thumbnail 

Younger Workers
Why would a healthy 31-year-old need long-term care insurance?

Consider these facts:
  • About 70% of people over age 65 will require at least some type of long-term care services during their lifetime.1

  • More than one third of CNA insureds receiving long-term care benefits are age 65 or younger.2

  • Fifty-two million caregivers in the U.S provide care to adults with a disability or illness.3 

Middle Aged Workers thumbnail 

Middle-Aged Workers
They diligently saved for retirement until an unexpected stroke put everything at risk.

21st Century Family thumbnail 

The 21st Century Family
As a family's medical needs increase, long-term care coverage helps everyone stay independent and happy.

Retirees and Spouses thumbnail Retirees and Spouses
When Medicare and Medicaid didn't offer enough protection and security, Frank and Elizabeth were glad they'd purchased long-term care insurance.

 

Younger Workers

Until last month, Sue was on the go all day long and well into the evening. But now, after a serious accident, she'll need care for at least a year.

 

Sue had been skeptical when her employer first offered group long-term care insurance. What did a healthy 31-year-old need with something for the elderly? She already had long-term disability insurance through her employer.

 

Sue read the material her employer provided and learned that disability insurance, which is often confused with long-term care insurance, is intended to replace lost income if one becomes disabled and cannot work. Most of that money is needed for rent, utilities and food. After that, there is usually not much left to pay for long-term care.

 

Sue also read that long-term care means much more than just care in a nursing home. It also includes care right at home. The price was reasonable, and it seemed like a good idea to buy it. Her choice was certainly the right one.

Younger Workers image 


Things to consider …

  • More than one third of the claims we pay go to working-age adults.2
  • Long-term care insurance helps safeguard your savings and protect your income if you need expensive long-term care. It helps maintain your ability to provide for your children or other family members.
  • The younger you are when coverage begins, the lower your premiums for the duration of your participation in the plan. Once you have coverage, your premiums will not increase just because you grow older or file a claim. Premiums may increase in the future, but only if CNA raises rates for all policies in the same class in your state.

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Middle-Aged Workers

At age 45, Don and Elaine Smith started serious financial planning. They always saved what they could, but with retirement less than 20 years off, it was time to take action.

 

They maxed out their 401Ks, spent wisely and bought long-term care insurance — something they hadn’t considered until Don’s company offered a group policy. Don and Elaine talked to a financial advisor and agreed that the coverage could be an important element in their financial plan.

 

The decision to purchase long-term care insurance seemed smarter and smarter as they watched several of their friends struggle to care for elderly relatives and parents. They didn’t want to burden their own children, and they didn't want to spend a lifetime's worth of savings on long-term care. Also, they discovered that Medicare and medical insurance don't pay as much as they thought.

 

The importance of their decision really hit home when Elaine suffered a stroke. It wasn't completely debilitating, but the doctors all agreed she needed intense therapy to get back on her feet.

With the policy's Home-Based Care feature, Elaine was able to remain at home while she recuperated, and she got the care she needed. These days, Elaine isn't running any marathons, but just walking around the block with Don is a step in the right direction.

Middle Aged workers image 


Things to consider:

  • You work hard and look forward to retirement. What impact would an accident or illness such as multiple sclerosis have on your retirement planning and your finances?
  • If your spouse became disabled, could you provide care and keep up with your other responsibilities? If your spouse has long-term care coverage, you may have protection against the staggering costs of long-term care.
  • As a parent, you’re probably saving for college or other big expenses. You and your spouse may be relying on dual incomes to meet your obligations and achieve your financial goals. Are you prepared to divert those savings to pay for care? Can your spouse stay home to help if you become disabled? Long-term care insurance helps safeguard your savings and protects your income if you need expensive long-term care.
  • Your parents may still be working, or they may be enjoying their golden years, but what if they needed full-time help with day-to-day activities? Of course, you want them to get the care they need, but can you provide it on your own? What if you don’t live near them? Unless they have long-term care insurance, you might have to provide or pay for the care they need.

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The 21st Century Family

Jack knew the time had come for his dad, Bill, to make some tough choices. Bill is 72 and lives alone since his wife died four years ago. He and Jack are close, but live in different cities. The house Jack grew up in is just too large for Bill to take care of by himself.

 

Lately, Bill has been slowing down. He's fallen a couple of times, and Jack increasingly worries about his father living alone. So Jack and his wife, Anne, talked it over with their kids and decided to ask Bill to live with them. No one — especially Bill — was thrilled with this solution, but it was the best they could think of. It would mean some changes around the house. Some days Jack and Anne would have to choose between taking care of Bill and taking care of their children. Driving Bill back and forth to his appointments would mean time off work and missed ball games for the rest of the family.

 

Then Bill got out the long-term care plan he purchased at work years before and started making some calls. Bill got in touch with a CNA Care Coordinator who came up with the perfect solution — an assisted living facility in Bill’s own town.


Now Bill has round-the-clock help that gives him the independence everyone hoped he could maintain. He didn’t have to move to a new community, and Jack is happy to know his dad is in good hands.

21st Century Family image 

 

Things to consider …

  • The 21st century family tends to be mobile and can live anywhere in the country — no matter where they grew up. Would your spouse and your children be able to care for you and handle all the other family responsibilities if you became disabled? Long-term care coverage gives you independence in the event of a disabling accident or illness.
  • If your spouse became disabled, could you provide care and keep up with your other responsibilities? If your spouse has long-term care coverage, you'll have protection against the staggering costs of long-term care.
  • As a parent, you’re probably saving for college or other big expenses. You and your spouse may be relying on dual incomes to meet your obligations and achieve your financial goals. Are you prepared to divert those savings to pay for care? Can your spouse stay home to help if you become disabled? Long-term care insurance helps safeguard your savings and protects your income if you need expensive long-term care.
  • Your parents may still be working, or they may be enjoying their golden years, but what if they needed full-time help with day-to-day activities? Of course, you want them to get the care they need, but can you provide it on your own? What if you don’t live near them? Unless they have long-term care insurance, you might have to provide or pay for the care they need.
  • The younger you are when coverage begins, the lower your premiums for the duration of your participation in the plan. Once you have coverage, your premiums will not increase just because you grow older or file a claim. Premiums may increase in the future, but only if CNA raises rates for all policies in the same class in your state.

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Retirees and Spouses

Elizabeth, a retired school teacher, started forgetting simple things. At first, the problems were small — misplaced glasses and keys. But soon, those small, simple things grew into bigger problems. The diagnosis was Alzheimer's disease. Clearly, Elizabeth could no longer take care of herself — but even though she needed round-the-clock care, she and her husband, Frank, were adamant that she stay at home.

 

Each had purchased a group long-term care policy before Frank retired. They read up on Medicare and realized it didn't offer the protection and security they wanted. Fortunately, her long-term care policy provides Elizabeth the assistance and care she needs, and her CNA Care Coordinator worked with both of them to develop a plan of care that suits everyone.

 

Elizabeth participates in an adult day care program three days a week. Frank drops her off and picks her up but still has time to himself during the day for errands, shopping and even an occasional game of golf. On the days Elizabeth is home, a home health aide gives Frank a respite from his chores.


Having Elizabeth at home means the world to Frank, and having benefits from their long-term care plan means Elizabeth receives the excellent care she deserves.

Retirees and Spouses image 


Things to consider …

  • Nationally, the average cost of part-time, basic home care is $16,000 per year.4
  • Medicare covers some long-term care costs for a limited time, but only if you need skilled care after a hospital stay. Someone with Parkinson's disease or another chronic illness might need assistance with everyday activities for an extended period of time.
  • If your spouse became disabled, could you provide care and keep up with your other responsibilities? If your spouse has long-term care coverage, you'll have protection against the staggering costs of long-term care.
  • Depending on where they live, your children might not be able to act as your caregiver – and would you want to ask them for financial help to cover your long-term care? Long-term care insurance helps you maintain your independence.


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1U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. National Clearinghouse for Long-Term Care Information. www.longtermcare.gov/LTC/Main_Site/Understanding/Definition/Know.aspx.
2Based on 3,024 long-term care claims paid by CNA between 1993 and 2008.
3 “Selected Caregiver Statistics”. “Family Caregiver Alliance: National Center on Caregiver. 2011.
 http://www.caregiver.org/caregiver/jsp/content_node.jsp?nodeid=439.
4A Shopper's Guide to Long-Term Care Insurance, 2008. National Association of Insurance Commissioners.

 

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